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Brooklyn Beer Night

Wed, June 20 / 4 PM

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Game Night - Irish Session

Wed, June 20 / 730 PM

Board games are hot right now — whether it’s the new Euro-style games like Settlers of Catan, Carcassonne, 7 Wonders or Power Grid, or you’re kickin’ it old school with traditional games like the Trumpesque, land-grabbing Monopoly. For a great midweek diversion, head on over to the Mucky Duck for a pint and a little tabletop competition; they’ve been at it for almost 25 years. We checked in with Stevie Hazlewood, day manager for McGonigel’s Mucky Duck, and she says the club stocks a nice selection of titles for the Wednesday night Game Night and Irish Session. 


“It runs the gamut from Connect Four, to Scrabble, Yahtzee, Risk, three different versions of Monopoly, Scattergories, Cards Against Humanity,” says Hazlewood. Play one of those games or bring your own, and scarf down pub snacks like fish and chips, Welsh rarebit and the club’s famous shepherd’s pie. 


Best of all, there’s no cover. 7:30 p.m. 


- Susie Tommaney - Houston Press

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Buxton

Thu, June 21 / 7 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

Buxton's forthcoming album, Half A Native, signals a departure from the rustic sound they have become known for and adds elements of indie rock, psychedelia, honky-tonk, ambience and distortion, resulting in their most realized album to date. 


Having enjoyed great success regionally in their hometown of Houston and throughout the South, the five-piece band decided to shake things up for this album and headed to Los Angeles to work with producer Thom Monahan (Devendra Banhart, Vetiver, Beachwood Sparks). 


From the dusty tones of guitar-slinging anthems to lonesome acoustic affairs that look outward and within, Half A Native is music for the search for home; the long journey to find somewhere, something, or someone that makes everything fall into place. 


Across 11 eclectic tracks Buxton ventures into vast sonic territories blanketed by singer-songwriter Sergio Trevino’s heart-clenched voice and melancholic, but optimistic lyrics. We take from a lot of different genres and present it in a way that I think is most honest for us, Trevino says.

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Randy Weeks

Thu, June 21 / 930 PM

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“Randy Weeks writes amazingly well crafted, beautifully melodic songs and delivers them with his own brand of laid back vocals and surfboard cool, very hip approach”  – Lucinda Williams


The consummate songwriter’s songwriter, Randy Weeks will pull you in, and hook you with each word & every note until you simply can’t let go.


Randy Weeks has earned critical acclaim from around the world:

“An amazing songwriter” – Salon.com


“Smart songwriting and a broad palette of pop music influences”  – CD Now


“Amazing musician”  – Billboard


“Cooler than an Eskimo beer box” – Houston Press


His cool, easy-going attitude paired with his sharp and witty undertones make Randy Weeks’ style undeniably his own. Soundtracking the ever-present undercurrent of our popular culture, Weeks’ music can be heard on international radio stations, Grammy award winning albums, and in feature films.

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Warren Hood

Fri, June 22 / 7 PM

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People ask Warren Hood a lot of questions at the end of a show – what was the name of that song you played - it sounded like Stephane Grappelli maybe, right after the Doug Sahm cover? How did you learn to play fiddle like that? Are you playing anywhere else this week? How old are you? Warren always obliges to answer all of the questions, that’s just his character (the answers are usually something like, “Black Cat”, hard work and listening to the right records, yes, definitely, and older than you think). He cares deeply about the experiences of the people who come to his shows and buy his records and works hard to create memorable live performances and albums.


Warren started playing classical violin at age 11 in the school orchestra, later studying privately with Bill Dick. He won classical music competitions, including the Pearl Amster Youth Concerto Competition and the Austin Youth Award, which gave him the opportunity to perform as a soloist on “Lalo Symphonie Espagnole” with the Austin Symphony, conducted by Peter Bay. Warren later balanced studying at Austin High with touring with Charlie Robison and the South Austin Jug Band. After high school, Warren earned a rare scholarship to Berklee College of Music where he majored in Violin Performance, played with Steven Tyler and formed an acoustic string band, Blue Light Special. At Berklee, Warren earned the coveted String Achievement Award, an award chosen by faculty to honor talent and as a vote of confidence on future success.


Leaving Berklee, Warren returned to Austin and was in demand as a sideman, playing with Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis, Alejandro Escovedo, Joe Ely, and joining The Waybacks, a band he would play with for the next ten years. Through all of this, Warren played with the South Austin Jug Band when he could, especially as a part of their Sunday night residency at Momo’s on W 6th St in Austin. When the residency ended for SAJB, Warren gathered a group of friends and took over Sunday nights under his own name, starting his first solo venture and releasing his first studio record, “Warren Hood”, an eclectic mix of both songs and legendary Austin players including Marcia Ball, Cindy Cashdollar, and Ephraim Owens.


The Momo’s Sunday residency lasted seven years and was a testing ground for Warren where he found his sound, learned how to lead a band, and gave the artists he shared the stage with space to shine - something he had plenty of experience with from the other point of view, having been a sideman for 10+ years. The way Warren ran Sunday nights had a lot in common with the residencies he grew up around in Austin – his father, Champ’s, ‘Singin for your Supper’ at Threadgill’s (Marcia Ball, Butch Hancock, Ruthie Foster, Sarah Elizabeth Campbell, Jimmie Dale Gilmore) and Toni Price’s ’Hippie Hour’ at The Continental Club.


The band Warren plays with now (Marshall Hood and Willie Pipkin on guitar, Nate Rowe on bass, and Jordan Cook on drums) is the current version of the band he started back in 2004 at Momo’s. This band plays every week at ABGB, drawing a mix of “old Austin” and newcomers, musicians and music lovers, and dancers who stay on the floor from the first to last song. The Warren Hood Band plays a mix of their own songs, classic country, and blues, with a nod towards their Texas roots with a few Uncle Walt’s

Band songs mixed in. Warren recorded “Warren Hood Band” in 2013, an album produced by Charlie Sexton and released by Red Parlor Records. A multi-instrumentalist (violin, guitar, mandolin) and accomplished singer-songwriter, Warren is described in the press a lot of different ways: “virtuoso” ”seven time Austin Music Award winner - Best Strings” ”Texas fiddler” ”Chet Baker crooner” “bluegrass picker” – but for him it all kind of blends together into everything he does (and what he does doesn’t always have fiddle). Warren says slyly that “playing different styles of music is like speaking different languages - the difference between violin and fiddle is how you roll your Rs. The more languages you speak the more people you can talk to.”


Warren's greatest influence is certainly his father, Champ Hood. Champ was a member of Uncle Walt’s Band, an acoustic folk trio from Spartanburg, South Carolina that also included Walter Hyatt and David Ball. They moved to Austin in 1975, prime time for the zeitgeist of the Austin heyday, playing at Waterloo and the Armadillo and building a cadre of lifelong fans. Their intricate harmonies and creative songwriting inspired their contemporaries, many of whom are today’s best loved and most respected songwriters and artists, and continue to touch those who discover their records today. Warren spends as much time with his band as he does playing and recording alongside other artists: David Ball, The Bodeans, Hayes Carll, Joe Ely, Alejandro Escovedo, Robert Earl Keen, Ben Kweller, Little Feat, Lyle Lovett, Joan Osborne, Toni Price, Bob Schneider, South Austin Jug Band, Redd Volkaert, Jerry Jeff Walker The Waybacks, Bob Weir, Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis and more.

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Kinky Friedman

Fri, June 22 / 930 PM

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‘Kinky Friedman’s Circus Of Life Tour.’


The Kinkster walks the high wire with release of his all-new CD, due July 3.


AUSTIN, Texas — At long last, Kinky Friedman’s second musical act begins. With the proclamation that here “is what music was, before it came homogenized, trivialized and sanitized,” Kinky is dropping his first all-new CD of original tunes in four decades. Called Circus of Life, it presents a side of Kinky that few would have suspected in the halcyon days of his Texas Jewboys, laying perhaps legit claim to the title “The Leonard Cohen of Texas.” On July 3, 2018, he will release it on his own terms and on his own Echo Hill Records.


A monster summer tour will follow in June, July, and August.  Yep, Kinky is finally doing it his way. Harking to his early years, he has chosen to ignore the Nashville ethos that all must be concertedly “radio friendly,” sweetened, and over-produced. What he and producer Brian Molnar have delivered is simply one of the most beautiful albums of this year or any other. The first single, “Autographs in the Rain (Song to Willie)” is already in heavy rotation on SiriusXM Outlaw Country, and there are at least four more top-shelf A sides.


Speaking of Molnar, he will be touring as Kinky’s opening act for most, if not all shows, promoting his new CD, Within Blue, also on the Echo Hill Records imprint.  Kinky and Brian have worked a number of tours together and now deliver a seamless performance, opener to headliner. 


It started with a call from Willie (Nelson, of course), who asked Kinky what he was doing at that moment.  Kinky answered truthfully that he was watching Matlock, the old TV chestnut, to which Willie replied, “That is a sure sign of depression, Kinky. Turn Matlock off and start writing.”


Kinky did just that and started writing the songs he hadn’t written or even contemplated for decades, tunes like “Jesus in Pajamas,” “Me and My Guitar,” and “A Dog Named Freedom.” After writing several songs, Kinky called Willie to let him know how successful his advice had been.  When Kinky asked Willie how he was doing, Willie replied, “A little up, a little down. By the way Kinky, what channel is Matlock on?” The Circus of Life, by way of Matlock. Via Willie.  


With Joe Cirotti on multiple instruments, and Mickey Raphael, Augie Meyers, original Jewboy Little Jewford, Clay Meyers, and Jim Beal providing amazing grace notes, not a single track on the album fails to reach its very high mark.  Kinky may “just have to stick with songwriting” after all. To verify this, he’s taking it on the road for one of the longest, most comprehensive tours of his storied career.  After flash mob-style appearances in Galveston, Houston and Nacogdoches, Texas, the Circus of Life Tour begins in earnest in Pittsburgh, and rumor has it that it will continue on forever.  Yes, the second act has begun.  May it never end.

Showing tonight

Alejandro Escovedo

Sat, June 23 / 7 PM930 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

Tickets on sale March 3.


There are songwriters who sing their songs, and then there are songs who sing their writers.


Alejandro Escovedo is one with his muse and his music. Over a lifetime spent traversing the bridge between words and melody, he has ranged over an emotional depth that embraces all forms of genre and presentation, a resolute voice that weathers the emotional terrain of our lives, its celebrations and despairs, landmines and blindsides and upheavals and beckoning distractions, in search for ultimate release and the healing truth of honesty. Sometimes it takes the form of barely contained rage, the rock of punk amid kneeled feedback; sometimes it caresses and soothes, a whispery harmony riding the air of a nightclub room, removed from amplification, within the audience.


His rise has been gradual, a steady incline rather than a quick ascendance, but it has deepened and burnished his music, made it closer to the bone, where it begins to break, deepening his insight and his ability to find that insight in performance. His tireless touring, and dogged determination to place one album after another, has taken him through many musical scenes, remaining the same persona within each, of an artist who doesn’t settle for the easy way out.


"You just do your good work, and people care,” Alejandro says over the phone beginning a promotional tour for his work, Street Songs of Love, his tenth solo album.


"I always believed, when I was a kid, that if you just worked hard, you would find fulfillment. I think I got a lot of that from my father, and my brothers. A working musician is all I ever wanted to be. Hard work, to stay true to what you want to do, and then eventually someone would notice for that very reason.


It is a journey that has taken him from Texas to California to New York and back again to Texas, encompassing a breadth of music as varied as the many bands he was part of before embarking on a solo career. In the 1970s, he surfaced on San Francisco’s no-holds-barred punk scene centered around the Mabuhay Gardens in North Beach, a guitarist in the Nuns; Rank & File helped unite the disparate worlds of punk and country in the 1980s; and after he moved back to Austin, the True Believers combined all manner of Americana music in a harbinger of what was to come in Alejandro’s solo career which begun in 1992 with the album Gravity.


"I had a good record collection,” he says when asked about his many roots and branches. Born in San Antonio in 1951, "I grew up in a family of twelve kids. My brothers were jazzers, into Latin jazz and percussion music, Cuban and Puerto Rican. Both my mother and father loved Mexican trio music, vocal groups like Los Panchos, and Tres Aces, who sang beautiful romantic ballads in three part harmony. And then I had a cousin who lived with us in the fifties, who was slightly older than me, a teenager who turned me on to Elvis, and Chuck Berry and the Big Bopper.


In 1957 we moved from Texas, where I’d heard the beginnings of rock, and country music, and the blues a little bit, because it was around, and we went to California. It was there I got exposed to the wealth of surf music, and Ike and Tina Turner, James Brown, Thee Midnighters, the 103rd St. Watts Rhythm Band. My cousins would sneak us into dances when we were young, and we’d watch the dancers. I got caught up in that, and the Anglophile thing, all those garage bands who listened to the English groups and turned it into something new.”


"You can’t be parochial about music,” he continued. "I learned that if you immerse yourself in something, listening to records over and over, so it becomes a language, you could learn to speak it. When I began to come of age, and was able to play the music, it became like a religion to me. We were fortunate that radio at that time had no boundaries. It was all brand new. No one knew you couldn’t play Marvin Gaye, and then Captain Beefheart, and then Sun Ra. It was all great, and to me, it all made sense.”

It was Alejandro’s exposure to the freewheeling anything-goes ethos of punk that set him in motion on his musical path. "The beautiful thing about punk rock to me was that it was all mix-and-match, at least until it started defining itself,” he said. "We would have shows where a reggae star like Max Romeo would play with a rockabilly guy like Ray Campi, and then be followed by the in-your-face blast of Crime.”


But it was in Austin, where he returned in the mid-1980s, that Alejandro found a musical geography that matched his own eclectic sense of musical possibility.


"It was this place that was completely open. The community really supported the musicians. It was small enough that you knew everybody there. You could see Townes Van Zandt walking around, or go to some beer garden and hear Billy Joe Shaver, or catch the Vaughan brothers playing every night at some place. 


Everybody appreciated each different type of genre of music. The punks respected Townes and the Vaughans, and the Vaughans respected everybody else. Musicians sometimes isolate themselves in their respective scenes. So to be in this small town where everybody encouraged each other, there were great shows all the time, it was cheap to live there, the beer was great, the girls were pretty, the weather warm, there was a great swimming hole… It was just like paradise to me. Austin is an oasis in Texas, where all these kids from small farming and ranch towns and West Texas and the Panhandle, and down in the Valley, and East Texas, they all come to Austin because it’s freedom.”


As the nineties began, Alejandro took this sense of independence and began to chart his artistic growth through a series of solo albums that expanded his renown and heart-on-sleeve sensibility. His first producer was Stephen Bruton, the acclaimed guitarist who unfortunately passed into the great beyond in May 2009. They made three albums together from 1992 through 1996 – Gravity, Thirteen Years, and With These Hands. He next worked with Chris Stamey – "I found someone who listened to all the same records, and loved the same things about rock and roll that I did” – and the albums that resulted – Bourbonitis Blues (1999), and A Man Under The Influence (2001) are assured and complex confessionals of love, desire, and consequence.


It was while showcasing his ambitious theatrical song cycle exploring the Mexican-American experience, By The Hand of the Father, in 2003 that Alejandro was felled by a dangerous bout with Hepatitis C, which took him off the road and into recovery. During that time, a double-CD tribute album, Por Vida, rallied his friends and family around him. Participants included Escovedos like Pete, Javier and Sheila E., and appreciators like John Cale, Los Lonely Boys, Calexico, Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, Howe Gelb, Ian Hunter and the Jayhawks, all covering songs from Alejandro’s considerable catalogue. Thankfully, by 2004, Alejandro was on the way to making a full recovery and return to performing and recording.


The Boxing Mirror, produced by John Cale in 2006, was the cathartic album he recorded after his illness. "I had to make that record; there is no other record I could’ve made at that time. It was uncomfortable to play, and even now, we don’t perform a lot of the songs off that record.”


Perhaps that led to 2008’s Real Animal, a conceptual songwriting collaboration with Chuck Prophet that tried "to tell the story of the bands I was in, how I got inspired by these bands, writers, films, books, and went on to play, and then the adventures of being in a band. Chuck added his perspective, which was a lot of times more humorous than mine. I often can get hung up on the heavier, deeper stuff, sometimes without meaning to,” he smiles, "and he brought humor and light to the story.”


The album also united him with producer Tony Visconti, "and that began a relationship that was very important for me creatively,” he said. "It’s one of those working relationships that I’d always heard about, and dreamt about, where he was family right away. He loved the band, he hung out with us, and he’s a real gentle, kind man, very warm and supportive. He gets everybody up and excited, and I think he brings things out in us that we didn’t even know existed. You don’t think about the records that he’s made, from Bowie or T. Rex, and the people he worked with. He just makes you feel that you’re not trying to live up to something that you’re not. You’re so comfortable around this person, and so inspired, that he just becomes you, and that loosens everybody up.”


This shared encouragement can be heard throughout every track of Street Songs of Love, recorded in a short twelve days in early 2010 at Saint Claire studios in Lexington, Kentucky, the second time that Alejandro has been there with Visconti. And, as each record before, Alejandro had an intuition about how he wanted to frame the album. Though he often shows up at gigs with a string section in tow, or has expanded his "orchestra” to a dozen pieces or more, "I knew I just wanted the two guitars, bass and drums format, that the strings would have to wait a while. In order to create and build some texture, I brought in voices,” but other than that, the album is stark and streamlined.


"I began not wanting to talk about myself, just to write songs, cool pop rock songs.” To that end, he devised an intriguing way in which to compose and arrange the album, which was to book a two month Tuesday night residency in Austin’s Continental Club, where Alejandro Escovedo and the Sensitive Boys could build the album in front of a live crowd.


"We would bring in three new songs every Tuesday night,” he says of his modus operandi, "and we would play them acoustically first for the audience, and then I’d bring in the rhythm section, and slowly but surely we would add each piece, like the singers. I had wanted to bring in horns, but it never made it to that point. But still, the audience could watch the songs develop.


"It was interesting to see it grow and blossom. It started with the room half full, but it built until the last one sold out. Every week it became more intense with the album taking shape in front of us organically, a work in progress. It’s as if it knew where it wanted to go, so that by the end of those two months we had watched songs begin with a verse and a chorus and become what we felt were complete compositions. And then we took that on the road for two and a half weeks, leading us from Austin to playing our first gig in Little Rock, and then working our way to Louisville, Kentucky, and then the following day we went to Lexington and started making the record.


"By then we weren’t thinking about the songs. They were a part of us already.”


Since the acclaimed "Street Songs of Love” Alejandro has released a Best of collection and 2012’s "Big Station”.


--Bio written by Lenny Kaye


See Alejandro Escovedo Live in Houston

Here at McGonigel's Mucky Duck, June 23rd is sure to be a date to remember. Our music venue in Houston will offer our stage the expert acoustical and musical talent of Alejandro Escovedo. His upbeat sound, vocals, and wide-renowned reputation in the music world have kept him entertaining lovers of rock through his storytelling. The varied rock sound in Alejandro's voice has kept fans focused and intrigued by how he takes a song to the next level!


One of the Greats


This San Antonio, Texas native has been traversing new musical frontiers since the 1980's. Austin, Texas saw the stellar guitar playing vocalist take to his roots and combine storytelling gold with a rock grit and alternative style. He really brought fans to his sound when he produced two singles in the 1990's called Gravity and Thirteen Years. And to add an exclamation point to his success in the music industry, he was named Artist of the Decade in 1998. 


He's performed with legends Bruce Springsteen, collaborated with Whiskeytown band member Ryan Adams, and received noted acclaim for his song "Silver Cloud" in 2010. Alejandro Escovedo has also had some cinematic experience. In the movie Veronica Mars, he made an appearance and sang an acoustic version of "We Used to Be Friends" which was a part of the movie's soundtrack. Alejandro is a man of many talents. He's strummed, sang, recorded, released songs with a wide variety of artists, and made his mark in the music world all over the country.


Spreading Fame


Alejandro has had success teaming up with Peter Buck from R.E.M and Scott McCaughey from the band Minus 5 to create the album Burn Something Beautiful. His more recent efforts in co-producing and co-writing the album has resulted in delivering a stellar diverse mix of roots music, punk, and classic rock sound to his fans. Rich with rock-solid instrumentals and timeless vocals, the album epitomizes what punk rock should be. It's raw and unwavering, not unlike the start of the punk rock music movement. His early solo albums were often found in the World Beat section, but now as his unique music offerings have caught the notice of roots and rock enthusiasts everywhere, his fame as a well-rounded musician continues to spread.


Join Us! 


At McGonigel's Mucky Duck, we are all about entertainment, delicious entrees, drinks, and an experience that will last for years to come. Alejandro Escovedo is icing on the proverbial music "cake." We want our honored guests to get a taste and stay awhile! Click here and discover how we serve our patrons the best of both worlds, dinner and a great show! 



Showing tonight

Open Mic

Mon, June 25 / 630 PM

No cover charge.


You’ll hear plenty of folk, country and acoustic renditions by performers that spent their afternoon in classes at Rice or a long day at the office. Not only does the pub feature an impressive array of live music almost every night, but the Mucky Duck has been listed by Billboard Magazine as one of the 20 best acoustic venues in the country. Each performer gets three songs or 15 minutes on stage. -- houston.cbslocal.com


The Duck stage is open for you to present your original compositions or a favorite song made famous by someone else. 


Comedians, poets, jugglers and mimes also welcome. 


Don't be shy. Come on out ~ It's your turn to be a Mucky Duck Open Mic Star.


Each performer has 3 songs or 15 minutes for their performance. 

Showing tonight

Staehely Brothers with Evelyn Rubio

Tue, June 26 / 730 PM

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Online tickets sales end at 5 PM on the day of the show!

Members of the classic rock band, Spirit, The Staehely Brothers (Al and John) are hosting two very diverse shows on the same night for one ticket price. The first, at 7:30 PM,  a cool collection of Staehely written acoustic numbers- some recorded by Marty Balin, Keith Moon, Bobbie Gentry, John Cippolina, Nick Gravenites, Patti Dahlstrom, Peter Cox of Go West and up and coming blues sensation, Annika Chambers-  others recorded by Al and John when they left Austin in '71 to join the legendary West Coast group, Spirit.  


Also featured will be songs from the the Staehely Brothers Epic Records release, Al's solo recordings on Polygram and SteadyBoy Records, as well as new songs- some influenced by Al's travels to Brazil.  John's guitar work makes clear why Robert Palmer, Bob Dylan, John Hiatt and Jo Jo Gunne chose him as their guitar slinger.  Sitting in with the brothers is Evelyn Rubio, the beautiful and uniquely talented singer and sax player from Mexico City.  A cameo performance by Al's son, Christian, featuring his compositions, will offer a glimplse of more to come from the Staehely millinneal. 


At 9:00 PM Al and John will rock the Duck along with Texas Music Hall of Fame drummer, Freddie Steady Krc, and keyboardist Mike Robenbaum with an electric set including songs from their Spirit days like "Nature's Way", "I Got a Line on You" and "Cadillac Cowboys".  The Staehely Brothers are not only contemporary artists but they are also a part of America’s musical heritage.  Merging their Texas style with West Coast rock they took their music on the road headlining Carnegie Hall as Spirit members and touring the U.S., Canada, Australia, Europe and Asia. On November 1st, they bring it all back home to Houston.

Reservations are highly recommended for this two show, one ticket, one night special event. 


with special guest, Evelyn Rubio